A Brief History of American Whistleblowing

On 17th January, shortly before leaving office, President Barack Obama commuted the majority of the 35 year prison sentence that Chelsea Manning was given in 2010 after being convicted of leaking classified documents regarding American military activity around the world, many pertaining to action taken in the war in Afghanistan, to Wikileaks. As a result, Manning is set to be released in four months’ time. The leaking of the Afghan war logs was perhaps the most significant act of political whistleblowing in American history, and launched Wikileaks into the public sphere. However, it is not a new phenomenon and so we must look back almost 250 years at some of the landmark cases of political whistleblowing.

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BYOB (Bring Your Own Bike)

While Germany is building a cycle highway connecting 10 cities that aims to remove 50,000 cars from the road, cycling in Glasgow still feels like a highly dangerous affair with seemingly very little being done to make getting around by bike easier, safer or more acceptable. Since the 2012 Olympics and 2014 Commonwealth Games, there has been an increase in the interest in cycling, definitely partly due to government campaigns surrounding these events. That same government, however, seems to be lost on how to accommodate this growth of cyclists. The national vision of having 10% of everyday journeys be made by bike in 2020 still seems very far away. A lot has to change, considering that current rates are under 2 per cent across Scotland.

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STV For Dummies

Most Uni elections use the STV (Single Transferable Vote) voting system. It is considered to be superior to other election methods as it reduces wasted votes and eliminates the idea that candidates can be ‘sure winners’ or ‘sure losers’. Here’s how it works.

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GU Rector Election: What You Need To Know

The views expressed in this article are the writer’s own and do not necessarily represent those of the QMU. 

The controversy surrounding the election of a new Rector at the University of Glasgow will not have passed anyone by. Since the list of twelve candidates was released on 3rd March, one outcry has followed another, particularly as the nomination of Milo Yiannopoulos made national and international headlines. In the midst of a great deal of heated rhetoric, it’s unsurprising that many of us are confused. Who are the candidates running for rector, how should we decide who to vote for, and why does it even matter? With hustings due to take place on Thursday evening and polling opening on Monday 20th, this is as good a time as any to take a step back from the unfolding drama in order to really unpack these questions.

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You Khan-Not Be Serious? A Critical Look at Scottish Nationalism

A few weeks ago the Mayor of London, Sadiq Khan, caused controversy by saying that “There’s no difference between those who try to divide us on the basis of whether we’re English or Scottish and those who try to divide us on the basis of our background, race or religion”. These comments were quick receive criticism from the online nationalist communities as well as many from within in the Labour Party, notably Scottish Young Labour, who rightly pointed out just how counterproductive Khan’s comments were in alienating a lot of the voters Labour is seeking to win back. Yet Khan’s comments reminded me of the very reasons I myself left the Yes movement not long after the referendum.

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“Shocking” and “Scandalous”: The Rise in Rough Sleeping in the UK

Homelessness is a phenomenon which I’m sure most of us are, sadly, familiar with, but the number of people faced with this hardship in the UK is growing at a truly shocking rate. According to a government study, the number of people sleeping rough rose by 30% between 2015 and 2016. To put this statistic into perspective, this means that on any given night, around 3,569 people in the UK are forced to sleep on the streets.

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