4th Walls and Where to Build Them – A Defence of Self-Awareness

Remember Deadpool?  Of course you do.  After years of development hell, and even a botched attempt in X-Men Origins: Wolverine, 2016’s Deadpool saw the fan favourite superhero finally translated to the big screen.  The film exploded in popularity, not only because it was cleverly written and made with such passion but due to its self-awareness of how juvenile and absurd it was, something that rang true about the source material.  Like all popular media however there was a faction of the internet outraged at the film, proclaiming that its overreliance on self-deprecating humour and fourth wall jokes made it childish and were an attempt to disguise its flaws by poking fun at them, even if it was faithful to the comics.

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Confessions Of A Solo Cinema-Goer

Since the start of 2015, I have seen 222 films at the cinema; that’s one every three and a half days give or take. I can count on two hands (and maybe a foot) the number of times I have been with another person. I have heard all of the archetypal queries and opinions on this habit and they usually boil down to “but don’t you like other people’s company? or “don’t you like to talk about the film afterwards?” Admittedly these have died down slightly as I have moved from school age through university, but occasionally I still encounter some raised eyebrows.

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Disturbing Films: Why and When You Should Watch Them

Movies are a grand form of escapism. They help us momentarily forget the problems or events of our current lives and offer us the ability to be entertained for their runtime. But sometimes movies can be pretty damn tough to sit through. Whether they deal with traumatic themes or they’re based off of a tragic event from history, some films seem less like light hearted pastimes and more like endurance tests in intensity.

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Film Review: The Handmaiden

In association with Glasgow Film Theatre

Park Chan-wook’s new film relocates Sarah Waters’ Victorian crime novel Fingersmith to 1930s Korea, which at the time was under Japanese rule. This period drama tells the story of Lady Hideko (Min-hee Kim), her suitor Count Fujiwara (Jung-woo Ha) and her new handmaiden Sook-Hee (Tae-ri Kim) in a Rashomon-esque fashion. First we are shown events from the perspective of Sook-hee, then of Hideko and briefly, but also intermittently, of Fujiwara. When Sook-hee comes to the mansion of Kozuki, an elderly Korean with a love of erotic fiction, a hatred of his own country and a basement which inspires terror into anyone who sets foot in it, she is introduced to the buildings and its inhabitants, including Hideko. On Sook-hee’s first night in the house she comforts Hideko after a nightmare and from this point onwards the two women seem to share a connection – one which only grows stronger throughout the film – but the arrival of the count, who woos Hideko at every opportunity, appears to make Sook-hee bitter and jealous.

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Film Review: Neruda

In association with Glasgow Film Theatre

Chilean poet and politician Pablo Neruda is the mythical protagonist of Pablo Larraín’s fantastical biopic Neruda. When President Gabriel González Videla (Alfredo Castro) outlaws communism in 1948, Neruda (Luis Gnecco), who was the leader of the communist party at the time, is forced into hiding. Videla orders policeman Óscar Peluchonneau (Gael García Bernal) to find him, an order which sets in motion a cat and mouse chase between two characters who are at once so different in physical appearance, political view and social position, and yet strangely alike in their philosophical soul searching. Gnecco and Bernal embody the two men in a way which suggests that they were born to play these roles. Where Peluchonneau is slender and sharp looking, Neruda is portly and flamboyant and where Peluchonneau is introduced as a man with a keen sense of duty and patriotism, Neruda is wild, reckless and self obsessed.

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