Film Review: Toni Erdmann

[5/5]

In association with Glasgow Film Theatre

British film magazine Sight & Sound polled 163 film critics from around the world at the end of 2016 to find the consensus on what the best film of the year was. It was not award darlings like La La Land, Moonlight, or Manchester by the Sea, but the German comedy-drama Toni Erdmann. Rightly so – it is the most reliable of the bunch, a heartfelt father and daughter story of finding a connection and common ground between two different lives from two different generations.

Continue reading

Film Review: Panic

[4/5]

In association with Glasgow Film Theatre

Imagine if Taken had a protagonist suffering from PTSD and was set in the concrete jungle of London. Reclusive Andrew (David Gyasi) and his promiscuous companion Amy (Pippa Nixon) are admiring the view from his flat when they see beautiful neighbour Kem (Yennis Cheung) attacked by an imposing figure. Having been voyeuristically drawn to Kem for months, Andrew feels compelled to help her, against the suggestion of those he confides in.

Continue reading

Film Review: The Death of Louis XIV

In association with the French Film Festival

Catalan filmmaker Albert Serra’s latest work, a drama tinged with a dark sense of morbid humour, chronicles in minute detail the final days of France’s greatest ever monarch; the Sun King, Louis XIV.

Continue reading

Film Review: Merci Patron

[4/5]

In association with the French Film Festival

If Louis Theroux were a French socialist filmmaker, he might be a little something like Francois Ruffin. Turning his attention here on Bernard Arnault, CEO of luxury goods company LMVH and one of the richest men in France, as he attempts to gain Belgian citizenship to avoid paying taxes and outsources labour to Poland and Bulgaria to save on manufacturing costs.

Continue reading

Film Review: Under the Shadow

In association with Glasgow Film Theatre

qmunistars4

With Don’t Breathe, Lights Out and The Conjuring 2, horror has been one of the surprisingly stronger genres this year, but Under the Shadow might just be the best film yet. The directorial debut of Babak Anvari depicts a mother (Narges Rashidi) and her young daughter struggling to cope with the terrors of a war-torn, post-revolution Tehran, all whilst a mysterious evil seems to be haunting their home.

Continue reading

Film Review: Love and Friendship

qmunistars4

In association with Glasgow Film Theatre

Love and Friendship is funny – in fact, it’s very funny. Whit Stillman’s adaptation of Jane Austen’s early epistolary narrative Lady Susan is a prime example of just how witty Austen can be, a fact usually lost in the Regency innocence that tends to epitomise most adaptations. Kate Beckinsale’s turn as the brilliantly devious and unscrupulous Lady Susan Vernon completes a surprisingly modern take on relationships, considering much of the crisp dialogue is sourced directly from Austen’s own novel.

Continue reading