Film Review – The Transfiguration

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In association with the GFT

First time writer-director Michael OSheas suburban vampire tale The Transfiguration tells the story of Milo (Eric Ruffin), a young boy living in a rough area of Brooklyn. With no parents, no friends and one brother, he is an outsider by his very nature. However, it quickly becomes clear that it is not just his unfortunate social situation that makes him different to everyone else. We see him sitting in bed at night watching videos of animals being killed, before he promptly goes out into the darkened streets to find his own prey.

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Live Review – Jon Gomm

Oran Mor, 05/05

A trip to the Oran Mor turned out to be a venture into the mind of a visionary musician and songwriter. The imagination of Jon Gomm is a place of heightened emotion – ‘Everything’ prompted each and every single member of the audience to fall into reverential silence, mesmerised by the man on the stage baring his soul with such power and authenticity, while his eulogising of the love shared by ‘hideous sea creatures’ (the inspiration for ‘Deep Sea Fishes’) and ranting over current politics evoked laughter and cheering.

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Confessions Of A Solo Cinema-Goer

Since the start of 2015, I have seen 222 films at the cinema; that’s one every three and a half days give or take. I can count on two hands (and maybe a foot) the number of times I have been with another person. I have heard all of the archetypal queries and opinions on this habit and they usually boil down to “but don’t you like other people’s company? or “don’t you like to talk about the film afterwards?” Admittedly these have died down slightly as I have moved from school age through university, but occasionally I still encounter some raised eyebrows.

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Film Review: The Handmaiden

In association with Glasgow Film Theatre

Park Chan-wook’s new film relocates Sarah Waters’ Victorian crime novel Fingersmith to 1930s Korea, which at the time was under Japanese rule. This period drama tells the story of Lady Hideko (Min-hee Kim), her suitor Count Fujiwara (Jung-woo Ha) and her new handmaiden Sook-Hee (Tae-ri Kim) in a Rashomon-esque fashion. First we are shown events from the perspective of Sook-hee, then of Hideko and briefly, but also intermittently, of Fujiwara. When Sook-hee comes to the mansion of Kozuki, an elderly Korean with a love of erotic fiction, a hatred of his own country and a basement which inspires terror into anyone who sets foot in it, she is introduced to the buildings and its inhabitants, including Hideko. On Sook-hee’s first night in the house she comforts Hideko after a nightmare and from this point onwards the two women seem to share a connection – one which only grows stronger throughout the film – but the arrival of the count, who woos Hideko at every opportunity, appears to make Sook-hee bitter and jealous.

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Is It A Bird, A Plane? No, It’s … A Taxi?

Airbus announce plans to create driverless flying car

Multinational aerospace corporation Airbus, through their Silicon Valley outpost A^3, has announced plans to create a a self-piloted flying vehicle platform for individual passenger and cargo transport.Initial testing of Vahana, the name Airbus have given to this ambitious new project, is set to take place by the end of 2017; a clear demonstration of how serious the company are about revolutionising urban transport.

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Film Review: Neruda

In association with Glasgow Film Theatre

Chilean poet and politician Pablo Neruda is the mythical protagonist of Pablo Larraín’s fantastical biopic Neruda. When President Gabriel González Videla (Alfredo Castro) outlaws communism in 1948, Neruda (Luis Gnecco), who was the leader of the communist party at the time, is forced into hiding. Videla orders policeman Óscar Peluchonneau (Gael García Bernal) to find him, an order which sets in motion a cat and mouse chase between two characters who are at once so different in physical appearance, political view and social position, and yet strangely alike in their philosophical soul searching. Gnecco and Bernal embody the two men in a way which suggests that they were born to play these roles. Where Peluchonneau is slender and sharp looking, Neruda is portly and flamboyant and where Peluchonneau is introduced as a man with a keen sense of duty and patriotism, Neruda is wild, reckless and self obsessed.

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A Brief History of American Whistleblowing

On 17th January, shortly before leaving office, President Barack Obama commuted the majority of the 35 year prison sentence that Chelsea Manning was given in 2010 after being convicted of leaking classified documents regarding American military activity around the world, many pertaining to action taken in the war in Afghanistan, to Wikileaks. As a result, Manning is set to be released in four months’ time. The leaking of the Afghan war logs was perhaps the most significant act of political whistleblowing in American history, and launched Wikileaks into the public sphere. However, it is not a new phenomenon and so we must look back almost 250 years at some of the landmark cases of political whistleblowing.

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